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Augustus at War : The Struggle for Pax Augusta / Lindsay Powell ; foreword by Karl Garlinsky.

By: Powell, LindsayContributor(s): Garlinsky, KarlPublication details: Barnsley, United Kingdom : Pen & Sword Military, 2018Description: xxxviii, 452 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cmISBN: 9781783831845 (hbk.); 1783831847 (hbk.)Subject(s): Augustus (Gaius Octavius), Emperor of Rome, 63 BC-AD 14, -- Military leadership | Rome, -- Military, -- History, -- 30 BC-AD 476 | Rome, -- History, -- Augustus, 30 BC-AD 14Summary: The words Pax Augusta; or Pax Romana, evoke a period of uninterrupted peace across the vast Roman Empire. Lindsay Powell exposes this as a fallacy. Almost every year between 31 BC and AD 14 the Roman Army was in action somewhere, either fighting enemies beyond the frontier in punitive raids or for outright conquest; or suppressing banditry or rebellions within the borders. Remarkably over the same period Augustus succeeded in nearly doubling the size of the Empire. How did this second-rate field commander, known to become physically ill before and during battle, achieve such extraordinary success? Did he, in fact, have a grand strategy? Powell reveals Augustus as a brilliant strategist and manager of war. As commander-in-chief (imperator) he made changes to the political and military institutions to keep the empire together, and to hold on to power himself.His genius was to build a team of loyal but semi-autonomous deputies (legati) to ensure internal security and to fight his wars for him, while claiming their achievements as his own.
List(s) this item appears in: Top Ten: War
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Royal & Noble Biography
RB -0063 P (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 4060

Includes bibliographical references (pages [398]-425) and index.

The words Pax Augusta; or Pax Romana, evoke a period of uninterrupted peace across the vast Roman Empire. Lindsay Powell exposes this as a fallacy. Almost every year between 31 BC and AD 14 the Roman Army was in action somewhere, either fighting enemies beyond the frontier in punitive raids or for outright conquest; or suppressing banditry or rebellions within the borders. Remarkably over the same period Augustus succeeded in nearly doubling the size of the Empire. How did this second-rate field commander, known to become physically ill before and during battle, achieve such extraordinary success? Did he, in fact, have a grand strategy? Powell reveals Augustus as a brilliant strategist and manager of war. As commander-in-chief (imperator) he made changes to the political and military institutions to keep the empire together, and to hold on to power himself.His genius was to build a team of loyal but semi-autonomous deputies (legati) to ensure internal security and to fight his wars for him, while claiming their achievements as his own.

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